11/23/2017

Medical article about delivering babies ,Negative feelings about sex ,cardio tennis ,trick your brain ,office illumination , Smoking

By Live Dr - Sat Jun 13, 2:47 am

Negative feelings about sex makes gays feel low

Washington: The traditional advice to gay men to fight, deny, or minimise their homosexuality only increases depression, greater isolation and poorer sexual health, warned a scientist.
Negative feelings about sex makes gays feel low
“In short, viewing homosexuality as a disorder is not only inaccurate, it may be harmful as well,” said Simon Rosser, researcher at the Minnesota University School of Public Health, who led the study on gays.
“This study is a missing link in our understanding of the relationship between sexuality and health,” he said. “It provides new evidence that negative attitudes towards homosexuality, not homosexuality itself, are associated with both poorer mental and sexual health outcomes seen in sexual minorities,” he added.
For more than 150 years, scholars and educators debated whether homosexuality is an objective disorder or whether societal prejudice, not homosexuality, leads to the elevated rates of depression, drug use, and HIV/STD epidemics seen in studies of gay men, Rosser said. This study tested both theories, reports Eurekalert.
Participating in the HIV prevention seminar, 422 Midwestern gay and bisexual men completed surveys assessing their homosexualtiy, positive or negative attitudes towards their orientation, besides a range of mental and sexual health variables, for the study.
The study will appear in the September issue of the Journal of Homosexuality.
Source: Indo-Asian News Service

Mothers delivering babies naturally bond more

Women delivering babies naturally bond more lovingly with them than those who do so by caeserean surgery, according to a study.
Mothers delivering babies naturally bond more
Women delivering babies naturally bond more lovingly with them than those who do so by caeserean surgery, according to a study.
Researchers led by Yale University Child Study Centre Assistant Professor James Swain recruited two groups of parents from post birth wards.
One group of 12 mothers belonged to the caeserean section and the other delivered vaginally. All women were interviewed and given brain scans two to three weeks after birth.
During brain scans, parents listened to recordings of their baby’s cry during discomfort of a diaper change. The researchers then conducted interviews to assess the mothers’ mood as well as their thoughts and parenting.
The team found that compared to mothers who delivered by caeserean, those who delivered naturally had greater activity in certain brain regions in response to their own baby’s cry.
These brain areas included cortical regions that regulate emotions and empathy, as well as deeper brain structures that contribute to motivation, and habitual thoughts and behaviours. The responses to their own baby’s cry in some of these regions varied according to mood and anxiety.
Swain said that no parent in the small study developed clinical depression, making it hard to assess the significance of the findings without replication and follow-up studies, reports Eurekalert.
“I suspect that the parental brain is ‘primed’ by vaginal delivery and affected by neurohormonal factors such as oxytocin, a hormone linked to emotional connections and feelings of love.
“These results provoke many questions and may help expectant mothers as they consider their options carefully,” said Swain.

Take up cardio tennis to add a social element to your strong workout

Washington: Tennis enthusiasts are increasingly taking to group exercise classes called cardio tennis because it lets them find players as skilful and fit as they are, says an expert.
Take up cardio tennis to add a social element to your strong workout
Chris Chopra, assistant tennis professional at the Indiana University Tennis Center, describes cardio tennis as exercise classes that combine tennis drills with coaching and 40 minutes of constant motion.
Just like other group exercise classes, he adds, cardio tennis adds a social element to a strong workout.
“The network of people they can play with really increases. They know they’re going to have a good workout and a good time, finding people with similar skill levels,” he says.
Chopra says that the hour-long class usually begins with a 10-minute warm-up that includes dynamic stretches, shuffling, the grapevine and other movements designed to get the heart pumping faster.
Thereafter, he adds, participants are in constant motion for 40 minutes, performing fast-paced agility drills to improve footwork, jumping rope and doing sit-ups and other strengthening exercises.
Participants often participate in fast-paced point play, which involves playing an opponent or doubles for one point and then quickly moving on to more drills.
Chopra says the class ends with a 10-minute cool down, often involving easy volleys or practice serving, and then stretching.
According to him, cardio tennis is suitable for all ages and abilities, but requires some experience of playing tennis.
“The program is designed to get people back into the game — or started, ” Chopra said.
Source: ANI

How to trick your brain into spending less

London: Can’t figure why your brain is conned to spend, spend, spend? Well, the possibility is that, while shopping the mind gets ”out of control” and it becomes hard to restrain retail urges – but if you want to take control of the buying instincts – then here are a few tips.
How to trick your brain into spending less
The tips have been provided by John Naish, the author of ”Enough: Breaking Free From The World Of More”, published by Hodder & Stoughton.
According to TimesOnline, a person can kid his or her instinct into spending less.
Here’s how:
1. Give yourself – and your purse – a break: Pausing briefly between choosing something and
taking it to the checkout can dramatically boost the chance of the cash staying in your purse, says a study to be published in December’s Journal of Consumer Research.
2. Don’t even touch your cards: Credit cards might not only anaesthetise retail pain, they may create a physical craving to get the dopamine high from spending, says Professor Drazen Prelec, a psychologist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
3. Keep brands out of your brain: Designer brands have proved unprecedentedly effective at persuading you to spend more money on “special” goods that are actually only of average
quality. Brands are painstakingly developed to encourage people to identify with them, to believe that their favourite labels have exactly the same human values as they do. So stay miles away from them.
4. Don’t shop with friends: People spend more money to maintain our self-image in front of others.
5. Staying calm costs less: People are more liable to go on a spree when financially squeezed. Under stress they can feel driven to hoard, says a study of students in Behavioural Research Therapy.
Source: ANI

Impact of office illumination

I was at Singapore’s 19th Asian Congress of Occupational Health Physicians to present a research paper on aspects of illumination amongst computer users in corporate offices.
Impact of office illumination
The conference at Suntec City was attended by over 400 occupational health and safety professionals from the Asia-Pacific region. Here are some pertinent findings:
Office illumination
Illumination or luminance is the quantity of light that falls on a given work area. For computer work, the illumination levels (200 to 500 lux) should be generally lower, compared to reading a document(500 to 700 lux).
In most corporate offices, there is a balance between these levels. The illumination is more towards the window. There needs to be dark sun-control films and Venetian Blinds.
Employees working at computer workstations with 500 lux experience visual strain, fatigue, redness and dryness of the eyes.
Since employees are so engrossed in their work schedules, they do not maintain a correct eye monitor distance of 40 to 65 cms.
Correct eye monitor distance, frequent eye blinking and rest breaks to relax and stretch eye muscles by following the 20-20-20-rule (every 20 minutes, look at an object 20 feet away for 20 seconds) cannot be sufficiently emphasised.
Blinking eyes reduces eye strain. Light sensors that will illuminate a workstation according to the desired norms within a radius of two metres will be feasible in India soon and already exist in western countries.
Nano technology
As nano technology (engineered particles of an extremely small size) is developing rapidly, issues on occupational and environmental health are just beginning to emerge on this subject.
Recent studies have shown that nano particles can enter the human body and interfere with cellular as well as physiological functions.
Asbestos
Pleural mesothelioma (cancer) and asbestosis (lung disease affecting lung expansion due to inhaled asbestos dust). Once exposed, the cancer may develop after 20 years, even if the employee leaves the job.
Newsy
Dr S M Shanbahag, National President of Indian Association of Occupational Health, has been elected vice- president of the Asian Congress of Occupational Health Physicians. That’s one up for occupational health in India.

Copyright 2008 HT Media Ltd. All rights reserved.

Smoking in presence of kids dangerous for them

Even as India bans smoking in public places from Oct 2, a Canadian study has warned that parents who smoke in the presence of their kids in cars and homes might end up fostering nicotine dependence symptoms in them.
Smoking in presence of kids dangerous for them
In the light of their findings on the consequences of second-hand smoke, the researchers from various universities in Quebec province have stressed the importance of a ban on smoking in the presence of children in vehicles.
Jennifer O’Loughlin, a researcher and professor at Montreal University‘s department of social and preventive medicine, said, “Increased exposure to second-hand smoke, both in cars and homes, was associated with an increased likelihood of children reporting nicotine dependence symptoms, even though these children had never smoked.
“These findings support the need for public health interventions that promote non-smoking in the presence of children, and uphold policies to restrict smoking in vehicles when children are present.”
She said their findings confirm previous findings which said that exposure to second-hand smoke might lead to several nicotine withdrawal symptoms, depressed mood, trouble sleeping, irritability, anxiety, restlessness, trouble concentrating and increased appetite among non-smokers.
As part of their study, the researchers chose 1,800 children aged 10 to 12 and asked them to fill questionnaires on their health and behavior, including exposure to second-hand smoke and symptoms of nicotine dependence.
Said lead researcher Mathieu Belanger, “According to conventional understanding, a person who does not smoke cannot experience nicotine dependence.(but) our study found that 5 percent of children who had never smoked a cigarette, but who were exposed to second-hand smoke in cars or their homes, reported symptoms of nicotine dependence.”
The findings have been published in the September edition of the Canadian journal Addictive Behaviors.
Source: Indo-Asian News Service

Smoking in presence of kids dangerous for them

Even as India bans smoking in public places from Oct 2, a Canadian study has warned that parents who smoke in the presence of their kids in cars and homes might end up fostering nicotine dependence symptoms in them.
Smoking in presence of kids dangerous for them
In the light of their findings on the consequences of second-hand smoke, the researchers from various universities in Quebec province have stressed the importance of a ban on smoking in the presence of children in vehicles.
Jennifer O’Loughlin, a researcher and professor at Montreal University‘s department of social and preventive medicine, said, “Increased exposure to second-hand smoke, both in cars and homes, was associated with an increased likelihood of children reporting nicotine dependence symptoms, even though these children had never smoked.
“These findings support the need for public health interventions that promote non-smoking in the presence of children, and uphold policies to restrict smoking in vehicles when children are present.”
She said their findings confirm previous findings which said that exposure to second-hand smoke might lead to several nicotine withdrawal symptoms, depressed mood, trouble sleeping, irritability, anxiety, restlessness, trouble concentrating and increased appetite among non-smokers.
As part of their study, the researchers chose 1,800 children aged 10 to 12 and asked them to fill questionnaires on their health and behavior, including exposure to second-hand smoke and symptoms of nicotine dependence.
Said lead researcher Mathieu Belanger, “According to conventional understanding, a person who does not smoke cannot experience nicotine dependence.(but) our study found that 5 percent of children who had never smoked a cigarette, but who were exposed to second-hand smoke in cars or their homes, reported symptoms of nicotine dependence.”
The findings have been published in the September edition of the Canadian journal Addictive Behaviors.
Source: Indo-Asian News Service

Anti-social behaviour may be a mental illness

Anti-social behaviour can be a form of mental illness, claim scientists at Cambridge University.
Anti-social behaviour may be a mental illness
The research team believes that adolescent males becoming unruly could be linked to a reduced level of the stress hormone cortisol.
The boffins said that when people undergo the anxiety of experiences such as public speaking, sitting an exam or having surgery, cortisol usually increases.
The hormone enhances memory formation and is thought to help people behave more cautiously and regulate their emotions, particularly their temper and violent impulses, the scientists said.
The research, funded by the Wellcome Trust, showed that disruptive male youths did not produce the same increase in cortisol when placed in a stressful situation.
All these analysis suggested some cases of anti-social behaviour may be a form of mental illness caused by a chemical imbalance of cortisol in the brain and body, the scientists said.
Led by Dr Graeme Fairchild and Professor Ian Goodyer, the researchers recruited participants from schools, pupil referral units and the Youth Offending Service.
“If we can figure out precisely what underlies the inability to show a normal stress response, we may be able to design new treatments for severe behaviour problems. We may also be able to create targeted interventions for those at higher risk,” the Daily Express quoted Dr Fairchild, as saying.
“A possible treatment for this disorder offers the chance to improve the lives of both the adolescents who are afflicted and the communities in which they live,” the expert added.
Source: ANI

High heels leave you low on health and wealth

High heels eventually leave women down at the heel, a new study says. Spindly stilettos and towering wedges walk you ultimately to the podiatrist’s parade of bunions, corns, bent toes, trapped nerves and disfigured feet.
High heels leave you low on health and wealth
Those who foot the bill annually in Britain alone add up to a few thousands, but the bills they foot are a bit high. Around 29 million pounds.
And mind you, free treatment through the National Health Service (NHS) means a lengthy waiting period. Private clinics are the only alternative for the impatient.
A study by shoe brand MBT claims nearly one in three foot operations on women are to straighten toes disfigured by ill-fitting shoes, mostly high heels.
The cost of each such non-NHS procedure is about 1,200 pounds.
If all patients opted for private treatment, these operations would cost a total of 10.4 million pounds a year.
One in five feet operations are to remove bunions, which is a structural deformity of the bones and the joint between the foot and big toe.
Based on the average cost of private treatment of about 4,000 pounds, this equates to 10.5 million pounds a year.
A further 3.3 million pounds a year would be spent on big toe joint replacement, 2.9 million pounds on operations for corns, 2 million pounds to remove trapped nerves, and 200,000 pounds to correct in-growing toe-nails, the study says.
Cosmetic surgery is also increasing in popularity with treatments including “plumping” in which a dermal filler is injected into the ball of the foot to make walking more comfortable.
The survey of 1,000 women aged 15 and above found those in Liverpool and Manchester were most likely to end up with foot injuries.
Nearly half of all women in the North-West of Britain said they wore high heels five days or more a week.
Forty-three percent of those in the South-East also chose heels five days a week.
Four in ten reported having an accident in their heels, with twisted ankles and tripping over the most common mishaps.
The Society of Chiropodists and Podiatrists explains that because stilettos force the wearer to raise their heel, the lower back bends to compensate.
This puts pressure on nerves in the back and can cause sciatica. Another common problem is damage to the Achilles tendon.
Sticking to heels no higher than one and a half inches can help, the study advises.
Foot expert Emma Supple told Daily Mail: “We need to mix and match our choice of footwear to allow our bodies time to recover. Heaven forbid that we ban heels from our wardrobes but we want to balance out our heel wearing days, protect our bodies from future damage and avoid injuries.”
Source: Indo-Asian News Service

Violent TV programs harm kids attributes

The amount of violent TV watched is linked to negative personality attributes among white males and females and –African-American females, according to a new study.
Violent TV programs harm kids attributes
To investigate the connection, psychologists Seymour Feshbach from the University of California, Los Angeles and June Tangney from George Mason University conducted a study that evaluated TV viewing habits, intelligence, and behaviour in 4th, 5th and 6th grade children.
To assess these qualities, the children’s parents and teachers completed behavioral questionnaires detailing the children’s aggression, delinquency and cruelty.
The children took IQ tests and completed surveys indicating the TV programs (which were later categorized as violent or non-violent by the researchers) they had watched during a seven-day time period.
The results showed a positive relationship between the amount of violent TV watched and negative personality attributes among white males and females and African-American females.
Interestingly though, while there was a correlation between watching violent TV and lower academic performance in African-America males, these boys did not exhibit increased aggression or lower IQ.
The researchers speculate that perhaps for African-American males, viewing TV (including violent programs) may play a different role than for white males and African-American and white females.
“The data raise the possibility that processes competing with or overriding the aggression stimulating or aggression modeling effects of viewing violence on television may be more salient for African-American males,” the researchers said.
The study is published in the September issue of Perspecitves on Psychological Science.
Source: ANI

Campaign to turn Chandigarh vegetarian

A students organisation wants to turn Chandigarh into a city of vegetarians. They’ve made a good beginning by persuading the owner of a non-vegetarian eating joint to switch over to vegetarian food.
Campaign to turn Chandigarh vegetarian
Members of YES!+ club (Youth empowerment and skills workshop), a youth wing of Art of Living, have brought this change with the power of persuasion.
“We were on a tree plantation drive at Punjab Engineering College (PEC) here when we noticed a restaurant operating inside the campus, offering non-vegetarian food to the students,” Himani Datta, a volunteer of YES!+, told IANS.
“We went to the owner of the joint and talked to him. We apprised him of the bad effects of non-vegetarian food on the health of the person and on the environment. After a long discussion with the owner, we finally convinced him,” Himani said.
“In return, we helped the owner design his new menu, catalogues and placards. Students of various colleges of the Panjab University (PU) contributed to this effort,” she added.
“We were serving non-vegetarian food for commercial reasons. Seeing the enthusiasm of these young students and on their continuous insistence I decided to change the menu to vegetarian,” said Praveen Fakay, owner of Combo Food.
“I was impressed with their straightforward way of directly approaching me and I am sure that this bunch of students can bring a big change in society,” said Fakay.
“I am proud to be a part of this initiative and I firmly stand for vegetarianism and urge all youngsters to adopt it,” said Pranav Talwar, another volunteer and a student of electrical engineering at PEC.
“Now we are planning to approach other prominent non-vegetarian eating joints in the city. Our endeavour is to make this whole city vegetarian,” Talwar said.
“It is a proven reality that we will become healthier both physically and emotionally if we lead a vegetarian lifestyle. We will conduct seminars and campaigns all over the city to educate the masses about the benefits of vegetarian diet and woo them to adopt a vegetarian lifestyle,” said Himani.
She added that there are around 100 active volunteers of YES!+ in the city.
All volunteers of YES!+ here have adopted vegetarianism.
Other activities of YES!+ include educating masses about global warming, pollution, taking out cleanliness drives and planting trees.

Source: Indo-Asian News Service

Leave a Reply