09/24/2017

multivitamins with iron?healthcare provider before taking multivitamins with iron?

By Live Dr - Mon May 25, 12:25 pm

Multivitamins and Iron

syrup-of-iron-with-multivitamins-homo-ton-s-250ml

syrup-of-iron-with-multivitamins-homo-ton-s-250ml

What is the most important information I should know about multivitamins with iron?

donot Never take more than the recommended dose of a multivitamin. Avoid taking more than one multivitamin product at the same time unless your doctor tells you to. Taking similar vitamin products together can result in a vitamin or mineral overdose or serious side effects.
emt Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. An overdose of vitamins A, D, E, or K can cause serious or life-threatening side effects. Iron and other minerals contained in a multivitamin can also cause serious overdose symptoms if you take too much.

Overdose symptoms may include severe stomach pain, vomiting, bloody diarrhea, coughing up blood, constipation, loss of appetite, hair loss, peeling skin, warmth or tingly feeling, changes in menstrual periods, weight loss, severe headache, muscle or joint pain, severe back pain, blood in your urine or stools, black and tarry stools, pale skin, easy bruising or bleeding, weakness, shallow breathing, weak and rapid pulse, pale skin, blue lips, and seizure (convulsions).

donot Do not take this medication with milk, other dairy products, calcium supplements, or antacids that contain calcium. Calcium may make it harder for your body to absorb certain ingredients of the multivitamin with iron.

What is multivitamin with iron?

Multivitamins are a combination of many different vitamins that are normally found in foods and other natural sources.

Iron is normally found in foods like red meat. In the body, iron becomes a part of your hemoglobin (HEEM o glo bin) and myoglobin (MY o glo bin). Hemoglobin carries oxygen through your blood to tissues and organs. Myoglobin helps your muscle cells store oxygen.

Multivitamins and iron are used to provide vitamins and iron that are not taken in through the diet. They are also used to treat iron or vitamin deficiencies caused by illness, pregnancy, poor nutrition, digestive disorders, and many other conditions.

Multivitamins and iron may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking multivitamins with iron?

emt Iron and certain vitamins can cause serious or life-threatening side effects if taken in large doses. Do not take more of this medication than directed on the label or prescribed by your doctor.

If you have any medical conditions, ask your doctor before taking a multivitamins with iron. If you have certain conditions, you may need a certain vitamin formulation or special tests while taking this product.

nopreg Do not take multivitamins with iron without telling your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. Some vitamins and minerals can harm an unborn baby if taken in large doses. You may need to use a prenatal vitamin specially formulated for pregnant women.
nobrfeed Multivitamins can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

How should I take multivitamins with iron?

Use this medication as directed on the label, or as your doctor has prescribed. Do not use the medication in larger amounts or for longer than recommended.

donot Never take more than the recommended dose of multivitamins with iron. Avoid taking more than one multivitamin product at the same time unless your doctor tells you to. Taking similar vitamin products together can result in a vitamin or mineral overdose or serious side effects.

Many multivitamin products also contain minerals such as calcium, magnesium, potassium, and zinc. Minerals (especially taken in large doses) can cause side effects such as tooth staining, increased urination, stomach bleeding, uneven heart rate, confusion, and muscle weakness or limp feeling. Read the label of any multivitamin product you take to make sure you are aware of what it contains.

water Take your multivitamin with a full glass of water.
food You may take the multivitamin with food if it upsets your stomach.

The chewable tablet must be chewed or allowed to dissolve in the mouth before swallowing.

Measure the liquid form of this multivitamin using a special dose-measuring spoon or cup, not a regular table spoon. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist where you can get one.

Liquid multivitamins may sometimes be mixed with water, fruit juice, or infant formula (but not milk or other dairy products). Follow the directions on the medicine label.

nocrush Do not crush, chew, break, or open an extended-release tablet or capsule. Swallow the pill whole. Breaking or opening the pill may cause too much of the drug to be released at one time.

It is important to take multivitamins with iron regularly to get the most benefit.

rt Store this medication at room temperature away from moisture and heat. Keep the liquid medicine from freezing.

Store multivitamins in their original container. Storing multivitamins in a glass container can ruin the medication.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and take the medicine at the next regularly scheduled time. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose?

emt Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. An overdose of vitamins A, D, E, or K can cause serious or life-threatening side effects. Iron and other minerals contained in a multivitamin can also cause serious overdose symptoms.

Overdose symptoms may include severe stomach pain, vomiting, bloody diarrhea, coughing up blood, constipation, loss of appetite, hair loss, peeling skin, warmth or tingly feeling, changes in menstrual periods, weight loss, severe headache, muscle or joint pain, severe back pain, blood in your urine or stools, black and tarry stools, pale skin, easy bruising or bleeding, weakness, shallow breathing, weak and rapid pulse, pale skin, blue lips, and seizure (convulsions).

What should I avoid while taking multivitamins with iron?

donot Avoid taking more than one multivitamin product at the same time unless your doctor tells you to. Taking similar vitamin products together can result in a vitamin or mineral overdose or serious side effects.

Avoid the regular use of salt substitutes in your diet if your multivitamin contains potassium. If you are on a low-salt diet, ask your doctor before taking a vitamin or mineral supplement.

Avoid taking an antibiotic medicine within 2 hours before or after you take multivitamins with iron. This is especially important if you are taking an antibiotic such as ciprofloxacin (Cipro), demeclocycline (Declomycin), doxycycline (Adoxa, Doryx, Oracea, Vibramycin), levofloxacin (Levaquin), lomefloxacin (Maxaquin), minocycline (Dynacin, Minocin, Solodyn, Vectrin), norfloxacin (Noroxin), ofloxacin (Floxin), or tetracycline (Brodspec, Panmycin, Sumycin, Tetracap).

food Certain foods can also make it harder for your body to absorb iron. Avoid taking this multivitamin within 1 hour before or 2 hours after eating fish, meat, liver, and whole grain or “fortified” breads or cereals.
donot Do not take this medication with milk, other dairy products, calcium supplements, or antacids that contain calcium. Calcium may make it harder for your body to absorb certain ingredients of the multivitamin.

What are the possible side effects of multivitamins with iron?

emt Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.
emt Call your doctor if you have serious side effects such as:
  • bright red blood in your stools; or
  • pain in your chest or throat when swallowing a ferrous fumarate tablet.

When taken as directed, multivitamins are not expected to cause serious side effects. Less serious side effects may include:

  • constipation, diarrhea;
  • nausea, vomiting, heartburn;
  • stomach pain, upset stomach;
  • black or dark-colored stools or urine;
  • temporary staining of the teeth;
  • headache; or
  • unusual or unpleasant taste in your mouth.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Tell your doctor about any unusual or bothersome side effect.

What other drugs will affect multivitamins with iron?

Vitamin and mineral supplements can interact with certain medications, or affect how medications work in your body. Before taking multivitamins with iron, tell your doctor if you also use:

  • acetohydroxamic acid (Lithostat);
  • cimetidine (Tagamet);
  • deferoxamine (Desferal);
  • etidronate (Didronel);
  • diuretics (water pills);
  • heart or blood pressure medications;
  • tretinoin (Vesanoid);
  • isotretinoin (Accutane, Amnesteen, Clavaris, Sotret);
  • dimercaprol (an injection used to treat poisoning by arsenic, lead, or mercury);
  • penicillamine (Cuprimine);
  • pancrelipase (Cotazym, Creon, Ilozyme, Pancrease, Ultrase);
  • trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole (Cotrim, Bactrim, Septra, TMP/SMX); or
  • an NSAID (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug) such as ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn), diclofenac (Cataflam, Voltaren), etodolac (Lodine), indomethacin (Indocin), ketoprofen (Orudis), and others.

This list is not complete and there may be other medications that can interact with or be affected by multivitamins. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor.

Where can I get more information?

Your pharmacist can provide more information about multivitamins with iron.


Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed.

Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. (‘Multum’) is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum’s drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum’s drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

Multivitamin formulas have become an integral part of modern healthy living. Due to out busy lifestyles, and the prevalence of unhealthy processed food in our daily diets, multivitamin supplements are almost essential these days in order to ensure that your body is functioning optimally. Most doctors and nutritionists agree that the average person does not get nearly enough essential vitamins, minerals, and other nutrients from their food intake along, which is why they recommend multivitamin supplements in conjunction with a healthy diet and regular exercise as the cornerstones of a healthy lifestyle.

Multivitamins are commonly available in pill or capsule form, though many are also available as liquids, fruit juice and candy for children who would normally be averse to consuming something so plainly good for them. Some athletes receive multivitamin injections in order to bypass the digestion process and increase the absorption rate of the vitamins and minerals. Furthermore, a number of multivitamin formulas are available in timed release versions, which have special coatings that release the active ingredients over the course of the day. This is beneficial because the human body cannot store all of the nutrients it needs, and yet it needs a constant supply of them. The timed release formulas therefore prevent excess vitamins and minerals from simply going to waste because they cannot be stored for later.

A typical multivitamin formula will contain certain staple vitamins and minerals, including the vitamins C, A, E, D, K and various forms of vitamin B, as well as calcium, magnesium, potassium, iron and other minerals. Traditionally, we would get these minerals in our diets through plants that absorbed them from ground, or animals that absorbed them by eating plants. But as has been mentioned, processed food often eliminates this natural source of goodness.

Vitamin deficiency can cause a wide range of problems, ranging from simple lethargy and tiredness (a feeling of being run down), to more serious medical conditions such as scurvy. In acute cases, a lack of vitamins can lead to death, but this is not very likely. However, since vitamin deficiency is a primary cause of many common health complains, multivitamins are often prescribed by doctors as a first action to treat a number of conditions both physical and psychological. Supplementing daily with multivitamins can not only cure conditions such as depression and arthritis, but beginning a course of vitamins early can help to head them off, so to speak, and safeguard your health for the future.

Vitamin supplements generally contain a recommended daily amount of each constituent vitamin and mineral. These guidelines are formulated by doctors and scientists based on their facts, research and observations, and it is not advisable to deliberately overdose on multivitamins in the hope of seeing faster results, as not only will this not happen, but there could be detrimental side-effects to overdosing on some of the active ingredients.

Some modern multivitamin formulas contain additional beneficial substances, such as omega 3 essential fatty acids for improved brain function and the maintenance of healthy joints, and pro-biotic components to assist the digestive system, relieving symptoms such as gas and bloating, and helping to treat intestinal conditions such as ulcers and colitis.

Of particular importance in a multivitamin supplement is the mineral Iron. Iron is utilized by the body in a number of crucial ways, including the transportation of oxygenated blood from the lungs to all the other tissue in the body. Iron is present in hemoglobin, the crucial protein constituent of red blood cells, and in other proteins that also store iron for future use.

Iron deficiency can cause a variety of complications, including anaemia, which is characterized by weakness and pale skin. People at particular risk of iron deficiency include pregnant women, young children, teenage girls, kidney patients and those with gastrointestinal problems such as ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease. Women who experience particularly heavy periods are also more likely to suffer iron deficiency and possibly anemia.

Iron deficiency can also cause the immune system to be weakened and compromised, which can cause all sorts of problems, and be particularly hazardous for at-risk groups such as young children and the elderly.

Vegetarians are also at increased risk of iron deficiency, since a large portion of our natural iron intake in our diets comes from meat.

People who are naturally prone to iron deficiency are particularly recommended to take a multivitamin supplement with an additional dose of iron in it.

If you do experience any of the symptoms of iron deficiency, you should consult your doctor in the first instance, as these symptoms may characterize a more serious health problem. In many cases though, supplementing with multivitamins and iron will be enough to remedy the problem.

While iron is essential to the healthy function of our circulatory system (and therefore every other aspect of our body’s welfare), it can be toxic in large quantities, particularly to children. It is not advisable therefore to exceed the recommended daily dose of iron, and you should see your doctor if you suffer any side-effects after taking a multivitamin formula containing iron.

Eating citrus fruits can improve the rate of iron absorption by the body, with the bonus that citrus fruits are very healthy and an excellent source of vitamin C.

Numerous studies have shown that in conjunction with a healthy nutrition and exercise regime, multivitamin supplement containing iron can be beneficial to a majority of people, helping to improve general health and well-being as well as raising energy levels and helping to combat possible future health problems.

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